Tag: Motherhood

Being Fun Parents

 


Being Fun Parents

Yesterday afternoon when I picked my daughter (5) up from school, she was upset because we are not the “fun parents”. She said that we yelled at her all the time, and that we told her off too much.

She said that she wished someone else was her parents.

I was shocked and a little upset, but to start with I didn’t show her that. I questioned her and what she meant, and we spent the 5 minute drive home chatting about it.

My heart did break.

If you follow me on Snapchat (happymumnz) you will have seen that when we got home, I changed it up a bit and we did have some fun.

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After the kids went to bed, and Chloe and I had a chat, I realised where the comments from her may have come from.

When she was sick, my Mum came over (her Gran) and she had a lot of fun with her. Just like most kids have with their Grandparents, or Aunties, or Uncles, or ANYONE outside of the immediate parental unit.

When we debriefed together at bedtime, I explained to her that we will always be parents first and friends second – and that every other parent out there is the same.

I explained that “Gran and Pa” will always be more fun than Mum and Dad.

And that’s right – Grandparents (for the most part) have done their time as parents, and it’s their time to enjoy the grandkids.

They don’t have to parent the child 24/7, so they can be the fun ones.

Of course I realise she might not understand this, but one day she will and until then I will be doing my best to encourage her to continue talking to me when she feels upset about something.

I am beyond proud of her for telling me how she felt, and I hear her loud and clear.

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It is a hard wake up call for me but one that I truly appreciate I have the opportunity to have.

Our family have a lot of fun together, but we are always parents first because it’s our job to guide our children in this world.

Yes I do yell at my kids. Yes I do tell them off. But we also laugh a lot more than both of those things and for me that is just as important. Our family is full of fun and laughter, but with guidance inbetween.

What do you think? Parents first, friends second?

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Celebrating The Dads

 


Celebrating The Dads

This sponsored post is a collaboration between myself and Noel Leeming, to celebrate Father’s Day.

My husband, Phil, is my rock. I seriously couldn’t do this parenting gig without him.

Early on after our eldest was born, we realised that I struggled big time to get back to sleep at night. So once I fed Chloe, Phil would take over and rock her to sleep and put her down. Once we introduced a bottle, he also helped feed her … this meant I got the chance to go to bed and drift off to sleep without worrying about anything.

Phil, naturally, just lies down and falls asleep – I wish I had that talent!!

For my first Mother’s Day, Phil paid for me to get special ear plugs which meant if I was having a rough day, I could go to bed at night and not hear the children crying – and he would get up to them.

When I was diagnosed with Post-Natal Depression, Phil took it upon himself to take our daughter out as much as possible – to give me a break.

He did, and still does, the main grocery shop on the weekend with the kids – to give me a break.

He used to take Chloe out for long walks, so that I could go back to bed on the weekend (if I needed it), or to catch up on things I had missed during the week (like movies LOL).

He did his best to understand and help me when I was at my lowest point before being diagnosed with Depression.

Even though Phil worked a full time job, he would often come home and cook the dinner for us.

Phil gives the kids a bath every night – that in itself deserves a medal really.

Phil bakes, cooks, cleans cars, mows lawns, fixes the house … EVERYTHING: he does it with the kids.

Phil does his best to understand that although I don’t work in a traditional 9-5 paid job, that I am still working and that at the end of the day, it’s a team effort that gets us through.

Through all the ups and downs that I have experienced, Phil has been the one constant thing in my life. He is the most kind, caring, understanding and loving husband and father I’ve ever known (of course!). I am blessed to have him as my best friend, and my children are even more blessed to have him as their Father.

Now that I have had some experience as a Mother, I can look to my own Father and realise how amazing he is too. Phil is very similar to my own Dad, and I am beyond grateful for my Dad for raising myself and my brothers and sister the way he did.

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Father’s Day is a celebration honoring fathers and celebrating fatherhood. It’s remembering that although they don’t change the toilet roll, or empty the dishwasher, that they’re still great guys.

Being a Dad is just as challenging as being a Mum – it has it’s own challenges. Fatherhood has it’s own ups and downs, and should be recognised just as much as that of the Mother.

The kids and I sat down and we talked about how amazing Dads can be, and how lucky they are to have such an amazing Dad in their life (they’re level of understanding about this isn’t that great, but the more we talk about it the more they’ll get it).

We talked about getting something for Phil, and went to the Noel Leeming website to check out what they had. We used their special Gifting Gizmo quiz, which helps to find the perfect gift, and here are some of the things that came up for Phil that I think you guys might like the look of too …

Just as a note, the first two we already have but we use them both ALL the time and I can highly recommend them ….

As I said above, if you need a little more inspiration – Noel Leeming has set up an online quiz to help you find the perfect gift using the:

Are you all sorted for Father’s Day?

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I have a Google Chromecast from Noel Leeming for one lucky person!!! Absolutely perfect to give as a gift this Father’s Day.

TO ENTER:
Comment on this post! Just tell me if you want it!

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Closes 31st August 2017. Open to New Zealand residents only – sorry everyone else!

Criticising Myself

 


Criticising Myself

It’s terrible, but I criticise myself and my parenting way too much.

The other day (in fact right now) I look back on my journey as a parent and I seriously question myself.

I look at my children and I think “they’ve gotten this far purely by luck, because I haven’t really done anything for them“.

I look forward to the times alone; I take every opportunity to have a moment to myself and I worry that because of this, I am a useless parent.

I know it’s not true though – I’ve been there for them through thick and thin when they were babies, even if I did dream about being able to go to work and escape the insanity that was parenting.

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I know, like every parent, I stayed up feeding them, burping them and then agonising over trying to get them to sleep.

I know that I teach my children it’s ok to cry and be themselves.

I know that from a young age, every time we went up and down stairs, I would count; so that they would start learning.

I know that we try and teach our children that it’s ok not to like someone, but you have to be kind to them.

I know I have taught them a whole lot of things which lead them to be the way they are now …

But I can’t help but look back on it, and then look at where they are now and think “that’s purely by luck because I honestly don’t feel like I’ve been there at all for them”.

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I’m not the biggest fan of “pretend play” – mainly because I just can’t fully immerse myself in it.

Even though I have a crap tonne of activities here on my website, I often feel too lazy to set them up and do them.

I don’t often bake with my kids because I can’t be bothered with the mess.

I think it’s because of what I said above PLUS the fact that I enjoy the time to myself and feel like even though I’m HERE, I’m not HERE.

I know I am way too hard on myself, but these are thoughts that go through my mind as a parent.

Does that even make any sense?

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Regretting Motherhood Does Not Make You A Bad Mother


© Can Stock Photo / halfpoint

 


Regretting Motherhood Does Not Make You A Bad Mother

I read an article on The Sydney Morning Herald website about when women regret motherhood.

This happened to me when I first became a mother. Up until my baby was born, I couldn’t wait to be a Mum. In fact, I’d probably spent at least 10-15 years imagining myself as a Mother.

So when I had a baby, one of the things I really struggled with, was the fact that I was pretty sure I had made a mistake. A mistake that I couldn’t change or take back.

For a while, I did regret Motherhood.

Mainly because it wasn’t what I thought it would be. Nobody can really explain to anyone how hard it is. That first year when you pretty much get zero sleep, and are held to ransom by a child who can only communicate by crying.

Not everyone plans to be a Mother; to some it happens by accident. To others for reasons that are out of their control.

It is ok to regret Motherhood.

“When a woman tells you she regrets becoming a mother, she’s not telling you she dislikes her children. She’s telling you she dislikes the job. How many times have you worked with co-workers you loved but hated the job? It’s the same with motherhood but it’s a job no woman is allowed to quit.” (taken from the SMH article)

So many times you see in online forums where a Mum (or even a Dad because it’s just as hard for them too), complains about something to do with parenting and they get the cliched “why did you have children if you can’t handle it”

OR “shouldn’t have had children if you’re going to moan like this”

Just like the quote from the SMH article – when was that ever a helpful statement to make. If you’ve ever bitched and moaned about your job you should understand that it’s cathartic to get it out. It’s cathartic to say “actually some days I find it hard and I wish I could go back to the other job I had”.

It doesn’t make you a bad person.

To everyone out there who has struggled: you are not a bad Mum for regretting motherhood.

I say this a lot but each day something changes; your child does grow up. Every day life changes – it’s never the same. It might not get easier but you won’t have a screaming baby for 20 years (thank God!).

To everyone out there who HASN’T struggled: it always pays to check yourself before you comment online. Just because you haven’t experienced it, doesn’t mean you’re right and they’re wrong. Everyone experiences things differently in life and you should thank your lucky stars you didn’t have that additional struggle to deal with.

Have you ever regretted Motherhood?

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The Things I Worry About As A Parent


This post is sponsored by Stuff Fibre

 


The Things I Worry About As A Parent

Want to know what I worry about as a parent? Everything. EVERY FREAKING THING.

I worry that they’re going to be picky eaters their whole life. I worry they’ll NEVER sleep through the night. I worry our house isn’t big enough to hold us and our kids. I worry the house is too damp and that my kids will get sick. I worry when my kids get sick. I worry my kids won’t like me when they grow up. I worry about what school to send my kids to … I worry about everything.

When I was growing up, I’m sure my parents worried as much as I do: worried we were hitting all of the milestones at the right time, worried we would be ok at Kindy / Daycare / School, worried we would make friends or even that we would get bullied. I don’t doubt that they worried, but what I worry about now is quite different to what they used to worry about!

Here are some things that have weighed heavily on my mind, AND STILL DO:

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The Usual Stuff:
Ya know, the “how many words are they saying” or the “they haven’t walked yet is something wrong” type of worry. The milestone worries. I think we all have those, and we will continue to have them. It’s natural to worry your child isn’t doing something – especially if you know of babies at a similar age. It’s very easy to compare ourselves to others, even when we know better. I also worry about what I feed my kids … I don’t want them to be judged for what they eat, but I also want them to eat …

The Pre-School / School Stuff:
I worried a lot about whether my kids were ready for Kindy and School. I always worried I was making them do something they weren’t prepared for – but they always managed to step up. I was always prepared to keep them home until they were ready though.

The Bullying Stuff:
I was bullied as a teenager and it was horrible. I am constantly worrying my children will be bullied, or be the bully-er. It’s always on my mind and I hope I can instil some good values into my children so that they know to stand up for themselves, and to not be mean to others.

The Internet Stuff:
This is a pretty big worry, as the internet brings a whole new range of problems for us parents. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Google Plus, Snapchat: all of these ways to chat with people and view the world. All of these ways to bully someone, or to be exposed to things children shouldn’t be exposed to. Currently my kids are 3, and 5, so the most they use the internet for is YouTube; but even then it’s concerning!

As they grow up though, they will want to use social media sites and that scares me a bit. My parents didn’t grow up with it, and neither did I; so as parents WE are paving the way for generations ahead of us. We are the ones who make the mistakes now so that others don’t get it wrong.

I was recently asked to review the Stuff Fibre services, in particular the SafeZone feature. Basically SafeZone filters out any adult content, social media sites or anything you don’t want your kids being exposed to.

SafeZone is a free service, and works within your fibre connection, so it applies to every device connected to your home network, making the internet a safer place. The set up is very basic (if I can do it, so can you).

Essentially once you have Stuff Fibre, you have access to SafeZone. From there you can select a profile that fits your family (Young Child, Young Teen, Mature Teen, Open). Once you set it up, you can then customise which content your children have access to.

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I don’t want to have to “control” my kids like this, but reality is there is a lot of stuff out there that I don’t want my kids being exposed to. Not at a young age.

Sometimes when they’re on YouTube they come across adult content (not THAT type of content but they could easily find that too!). With SafeZone it means they think they’re getting the freedom to “browse” without being exposed to the nasties.

The same goes for when they’re older – when they’ll try and access those social media sites without me knowing. SafeZone will stop that from happening.

I like to think of it as holding my kids hands while we cross the road. They’re still able to walk across, I’m not carrying them, but I’m guiding them at the same time to ensure they’re not harmed. AND I’m teaching them to look out for the dangers along the way.

I realise we can’t protect them forever, but some things do need worrying about – and the internet is one of them.

What do you worry about as a parent?

Thank you Stuff Fibre for having SafeZone out there for us parents. This is a sponsored post, however all words and opinions are my own (unless specified).

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I Am Not A Shit Parent!

 


I Am Not A Shit Parent!

This post was written in response to a Facebook post I did about how hard it is to navigate the self service checkouts at the supermarket, or Kmart, etc etc, when you have kids with you. Specifically young kids.

Whilst the majority of the comments agreed, there were a few (more than a few) saying “maybe if you disciplined your kid you wouldn’t have this problem”. Or “try parenting”. Or “if you let your kids walk all over you, they’ll turn into monsters when they grow older”. OR the best one “you’re a bad/shit parent”.

I’m not sure if you’re aware, but the way parenting is supposed to work is that you’re supposed to teach your kids the way of the world; and they’re supposed to not listen. They’re supposed to push back and test the boundaries constantly.

You’re there to keep them in line and remind them, ALL THE TIME, about the way we should be doing things.

Did you know that no two children are the same? *GASP* What Maria?! So my child who was perfect and listened to me, there isn’t a duplicate of him out there?!

NO. Children may be similar but none are the same.

I could parent both of my children exactly the same (and I do mostly) and they’d still do different things.

My 5 year old is a compliant child who, for the most part, listens to what I say. She needs to be constantly reminded (like all children) but she listens and follows instruction.

My 3 year old, however, is much more defiant. I find myself having to be harder on him because he constantly pushes back on me and what I’m asking of him.

Plus. He is only 3 f’ing years old. He’s only been alive for THREE YEARS. It’s not like he’s an adult – I’m still teaching him the ways of the world.

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If I go to the supermarket, I ALWAYS state the rules and my expectations. And I repeat them; a thousand times. Yet they still forget.

Does that make me bad? NO.

If they play up, they get warnings and then a punishment. I ALWAYS talk to them about this so they know what’s coming. They still play up: so action = consequence.

Does that make me a shit parent? Because they’re still pushing the boundaries? NO

It makes me a PARENT.

I might be an idiot for taking my kids to the supermarket, but I am NOT A SHIT PARENT.

My children are NOT undisciplined. They are children, doing what children do.

And I’m a parent, doing what I do. I’m still figuring shit out, and having comments from people perpetuating these shitty ideas that a kid misbehaving makes you a “shitty parent” really doesn’t help anyone.

I asked my Mum (who had 4 kids under 5) if we were well behaved at the supermarket, and she flat out said “YES”. Of course I gave her the “WTF MUM” look, and she said “Maria, I never took any of you to the supermarket with me until you were about 7-8 because it was too much stress”.

So by the time we went to the supermarket, we were old enough to know what was right or wrong, and had stopped pushing the boundaries like we used to do when we were toddlers.

I think my Mum is onto something and clearly I need to be doing more of the “not going to the supermarket with my kids” thing haha

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Kids misbehave all the time. As parents, we have to repeat ourselves ALL the time. It’s the cycle of things.

Kids grow up, and they learn.

Hopefully when my kids grow up, I can teach them not to be an asshole in real life AND online … LOLOL

Snapchat me yo: happymumnz

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I’m Not A Bad Mum

 


I’m Not A Bad Mum

I wake up most days raring to go.

I’m excited. I’m ready. Give me coffee and I can do anything.

“Today will be a great day” I say to myself as I prepare for my kids to wake up and come out.

And then they do just that: they wake up and come out.

Within 30 seconds I can feel my heart starting to race: I’m about to yell. It’s only been 30 seconds, surely not Maria. Surely you don’t need to yell or even raise your voice so early in the morning. But I do …

Because kids are kids. They’re here to test us, to push us to our limits. They’re here to remind us we have no control …

Every day I struggle, but in no way does it make me a bad parent. I am not a bad Mum. I’m simply just struggling to deal with children, because I’m an adult and have forgotten what it’s light.

Here are some of the things I do that make me feel like a bad mum, even if I’m not:

  • I cry in front of my kids
  • I yell
  • I swear
  • I say “NO” too many times each day
  • “Stop putting that in your mouth” is a catch phrase of mine
  • My kids eat sugared treats every now-and-then
  • Some days my kids have cocktail sausages for lunch
  • Some days I turn on the TV so I can have a cup of coffee in peace, and check my Facebook
  • We eat cereal *gasp*
  • My kids probably watch too much TV
  • Our family motto is “a family that devices together, stays together” … as we all watch devices at the same time every-now-and-then
  • My kids eat Kinder Surprise Eggs
  • Sometimes my kids get McDonald’s Happy Meals
  • When my kids fight, sometimes I just say “I don’t care what you do, whoever wins wins”
  • I don’t vacuum every single day
  • I don’t wash my kids’ PJs every day

When I post about some of the things I do online, it makes me feel less alone. Suddenly I get people saying “hey I do that too” and I feel validated. Like I’m not the only one who tries their hardest but sometimes just throws their hands up and says “fine just lick the bowl” …

i have come to realise that:

  • There are parents out there who yell at their kids.
  • There are parents who haven’t tidied their house for a very long time.
  • There are parents who hate playing with play dough.
  • There are parents who do what they need to do to get through the day – even if that means giving a child a Kinder Surprise Egg
  • There are parents who are sure they’re screwing up their kids, just like I feel like I am.

So if there are other parents out there who feel and act the same as me, that means I’m not alone.

Surely that means I’m not a bad parent, right?!

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Things I Don’t Give A Sh*t About As A Mum

 


Things I Don’t Give A Sh*t About As A Mum

Completely and utterly inspired by Scary Mommy’s “8 Things I Don’t Give A Sh*t About As A Parent”. I didn’t agree with everything on the list, but it did have me giggling and made me think “what do I not give a sh*t about as a parent”. Here’s a few things I definitely don’t give a sh*t about …

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1. I don’t give a sh*t about feeding my kids healthy food all the time
Seriously, if it was that easy, I’d do it. My kids eat pretty damn well but I’m not ever going to deny them a treat. And by golly if a Kinder Surprise gets me through a shopping trip then I’m not only going to get it, I’m probably going to buy shares in the company too.

2. I don’t give a sh*t if their clothes have holes in them
A small hole in the knee of my kids’ clothes is not going to wreck the clothes. When I can see more skin than clothes, then it gets tossed.

3. I don’t give a sh*t if my house is a mess from 7am-7pm
As long as the house is clean when I go to bed and when I wake up, I don’t really care. The house rules are “clean up before you move onto the next activity”, and some days there are lots of things happening. And some days, I can’t be f’k cleaning up. Some days its quite liberating just leaving a mess – although you know it’s messy when the kids say “Whoa what happened to the house” …

4. I don’t give a sh*t about screen-time
We have a no tv rule during the week before school. But I understand after school the kids can get very very tired. Sometimes we all need to chill out – including myself! Some days I struggle to the point I want to leave the house – if putting a device in front of my child helps me to calm down for five minutes, then I’m going to do it.

5. I don’t give a sh*t about after-school activities
At this stage my kids are too young, but I can tell you without a doubt I will never pressure my kids to do activities outside of school UNLESS they specifically request it. There’s nothing worse in life than making someone do something they don’t want to do.

6. I don’t give a sh*t about having a clean car 
Seriously, my life is spent organising little people in and out of the car. If I could, at the same time, keep it clean I would. Somehow that car always ends up in a mess and I always look at it and think “why” or “how” …. and then I remember that the main goal is to never be in the car for an extended period of time with the kids – so we just usually bolt and run inside to escape from the lava monster … oh wait that’s the kids. Anyway … the car is always the last on my list of things to keep clean.

7. I don’t give a sh*t about coffee groups
They were just never for me. It doesn’t make me a bad parent for not wanting to partake in them, I was just never interested. I also never took my kids to playcentre either… *gasp*

8. I don’t give a sh*t about my kids not making their own lunches
I actually secretly love making the kids’ lunches. If they willingly want to do it, then great. Otherwise I LOVE DOING IT.

9. I don’t give a sh*t if my kids don’t have a bath every day
Some days as a Mum, I really do struggle. Bath time can be difficult with fights, so some days I just don’t do it. Do I care? Nope.

10. I don’t give a sh*t what other parents do
As long as their kids are fed and happy, IDGAF what anyone else does.

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Today I Became The Shouty Mum

 


Today I Became The Shouty Mum

3pm and children are finishing school; they’re tired and emotions are high. My children, especially my girl, are no exception to this.

Today I became the shouty Mum.

My 5 year old was tired, and my 3 year old was the opposite. In fact, all he wants to do is a) talk to his sister, and b) annoy his sister. Both of which I have to try and stop from happening because it NEVER ends well. Especially at 3pm.

Whilst walking on the way from school to the car, my kids started running ahead of me. Now our rule is “you don’t have to hold my hand on the foot path, but you MUST stay by my side for safety reasons”.

My 5 year old started running, which then must have sent out this message to my 3 year old that “THE RACE IS ON”.

I semi-yell “Please don’t run”.

But he starts running.

Then she saw him running, so she ran faster. So I yell “PLEASE STOP RUNNING”.

Except apparently the Olympics have started and if you win you win BIG.

So now my two kids are running towards my car which is, of course, parked on the road.

So I yell “STOP RIGHT NOW” – and they both DO NOT LISTEN.

So I BEAST YELL IT. And when a beastly Mum yells, you bloody listen; and thankfully they stopped but by that stage I was FUMING.

Other Mums were around (hopefully understanding the situation), and I was so embarrassed. I wouldn’t change it – I will always yell if they’re in trouble, but golly it’s embarrassing. Someone’s always the shouty Mum, and today I was that one.

My kids got a stern telling off in the car, where I repeated “If I tell you to stop, you stop what you’re doing. If you’re running, you stop. If you’re talking, you stop”.

My daughter then said “but he was winning” and seriously I think I almost burst a blood vessel.

This constant need to “win” drives me up the wall.

YOU WIN NOTHING CHILDREN. YOU WIN BY ANNOYING THE LIVING DAYLIGHTS OUT OF ME WITH YOUR IMAGINARY RACE.

So now we’re back at home, and I’ve had another chat about how important it is to STOP when I say STOP. I said “it’s not because I want to be annoying, it’s for your safety”.

I think I now need to remind them every time we go everywhere.

Because you Mums all know, if you have to tell them once, you have to tell them a million times.

Le sigh.

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Activities With Kids: The Reality


Activities With Kids: The Reality

Picture this: it’s raining. You have a young child and you’re at your wits end as to what to do with them. So you start trawling through the internet for “things to do with young kids”.

You stumble across Pinterest and before you know it you’ve got the flour, and food colouring out to make some play dough.

You start getting excited. You give your child a toy to play with and say “Do you want to play with play dough” and they look at you like “Oh heck yes I do Mum it’ll be so much fun!”.

You mix that shit together and start thinking about all the time you’ll have to yourself once your kid starts playing with it. Fifteen minutes peace to enjoy a coffee while they sit there amused.

Mid-way through mixing the play dough together, you realise you’re missing half of the ingredients. Oh well … you don’t care because your kid won’t know the difference. Who needs cream of tartar anyway!?

Your child has now moved on from the toy you’ve given them and is now at your feet telling you to hurry up. Or screaming. Or both. So you start saying “I’ll be finished soon, just give me a minute”. And you start stirring and mixing faster. Flour is now on your face and pants.

Finally the dough’s mixed, and you can almost smell the coffee brewing. Your phone is charged – a coffee AND checking Facebook at the same time. BRING IT ON!

You add the food colouring to the play dough and before you realise what you’re doing your hands are in mixing it together. A thought suddenly crosses your mind “does food colouring stain your hands?” … Oh well just keep going.

It is at this moment your child screams “I NEED A DRINK OR I’M GOING TO DIE”. So you take your food-coloured hands and try to get them a drink. Then you go back to mixing it all together.

YES in case you are wondering, food colouring does stain your hands. As you tip out the coloured play dough, you look at your hands and think “hmm kind of looking a little red but who cares” – the prospect of coffee and Facebook is keeping you going. You’ve got this Mumma – your kid is going to LOVE you for this!

You roll the play dough into a nice ball, and continue making other colours; because you think to yourself “my kid will LOVE playing with four colours – red, green, yellow and blue”. And you think of the amazing photo that you’ll show to your friends about that time you made play dough and had so much fun!

You check the instructions and it says “Takes 10 minutes to make” but so far because of a screaming child who leave you alone for five seconds, it has taken you 20 and you haven’t even finished yet.

Finally, three colours later you realise that red, green, yellow and blue have turned your hands into this green / brown Hulk-like mess. It’s actually kind of horrific and you’re rethinking the whole “just keep mixing it with my hands” thing.

BUT you now have four beautiful colours of play dough in front of you. You click the button on the kettle on, to start heating up the water.

You get a plate out and put the play dough on it and put it on the table. WAIT! What about cookie cutters and a rolling pin? Gees what kind of Mum am I to forget these?!

So you pull apart half of your kitchen trying to find the star-shaped cookie cutter, and your massive wooden rolling pin.

What should have taken 10 minutes, has now taken 30 minutes. And because it’s taken so long, you’ve had to make your child lunch, which has added an extra 15 minutes to the mix.

So 45 minutes later, you finally have the activity set up.

Voila my child, you enjoy your play dough while I sip my hot coffee and check Facebook. But quick I need to take a photo!

Your child sits and stares at the play dough. They poke it. They smell it. They lick it. In between this you take an epic “check out what I put together for my kid” picture. Sweet, I can upload this to Facebook while I drink my coffee.

At this point you haven’t even started your coffee, let alone open up the Facebook app. Filter added to your epic photo … you’re about to push “publish” to Facebook when your kid gets down from the table and say “I’m bored”.

You look at your coffee and your almost published Facebook post and you think *sigh* “I almost had it … I almost had that moment” …. then you look at your kitchen and it looks like World War 3 happened and you think “never again”.

You jump online and just buy some Play Doh from The Warehouse because there’s no way you’re doing that again.

Reality: it doesn’t matter how much sweat and tears you put into an activity, your kid probably won’t want to play with it anyway. In the time it takes you to set the activity up, your child probably changed their mind.

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